3 Tips to a Better Community

Did you know that belonging to a community and engaging well, is part of personal self-care? It might seem counter-intuitive, after-all isn’t community about others?

Yes, and no.

Community is about the whole, you and them. This reciprocal relationship is vital to our personal well-being and success in life. Our deepest longings have to do with being known, accepted, heard, and loved. None of these things can happen without community. You can’t do life well all on your own.

So let’s talk about 3 tips to a better community.

Tip #1: Learn your enneagram type

The oldest wisdom tells us that first we must know ourselves before we can understand the world around us, or the people in it. How can we expect others to understand us, if we don’t even understand ourselves?

You are probably familiar with the following quotes:

“Know thyself.”

-Socrates

“Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom.”

-Aristotle

“Can you remember who you were, before the world told you who you should be?”

-Charles Bukowski

These quotes all point in the common direction of discovering who you are. The best way to do that, is through the wisdom of the enneagram. Unlike other personality typing systems, the enneagram looks deeper than behavior. The enneagram is based on your inner motivations, which only you know, or are aware of. Many of us might act the same way on the outside, but inwardly we are motivated by very different things.

Understanding your own motivations, means you know why you do the things you do. The puzzle of the world begins to make sense because you can finally see where, and how you fit into place. Not only will the enneagram explain your motivations, but your key longings, your core fears, the way you connect with others, and many other deeper meaningful aspects of the human condition.

The enneagram is the beginning of the journey of a lifetime.

Still aren’t sure what your type is?

Once you discover your true self, you begin to interact with others in new ways. Why?

You are more self-aware. This makes you see the patterns you get caught in, the ways you pull back, or push forward, and how you are harmful or helpful in any given situation. Seeing yourself clearly, allows you to grow and improve the way you do life.

Tip #2: Intentionally working on your own weak spots

Sorry, there is no shortcut.

If you want to improve your relationships and engage better in your community groups, you actually have to work on things within yourself that are not serving you or others. As we just pointed out, your awareness is heightened through knowing yourself. The enneagram is like a map, showing you paths available to you. You can use these paths to grow, to avoid your typical pitfalls, to lean in to your strengths, and to overcome weak spots.

Start by asking yourself good questions.

Why do I feel this way?

What is motivating me?

Is there something I am missing?

Am I jumping in, when I should be holding back?

Who am I doing this for?

If I don’t do this, what will happen?

Am I over-thinking?

Am I getting stuck in the past, and forgetting to move forward?

What feelings are behind this action?

Is it okay if I don’t pursue this?

Will this action harm someone?

Invite a friend to join you on your journey.

Only you know what your true motivations are, the thoughts inside your head, and the feelings inside your heart. However, a good friend can be crucially important to walk alongside you, as you dedicate yourself to working on hard things.

Share what you are struggling with, and become accountability partners for each other. Through this sharing you will experience growth, as well as opening up a space of vulnerability for your friend to feel comfortable growing along with you.

Tip#3: Take it to your group/community

I once heard this story about how a boat party works that really made me think about the way community works:

First, the largest, heaviest boat drops anchor. This boat serves as a building block for other boats to tie up along either side. The lines are tied as tightly as possible to minimize motion between the boats. It is important for the joining boats to alternate sides as they join to keep the balance.

With the anchor in the middle, there is equal tension and the least amount of swing. Now that all the boats are tied together, they become like one large vessel. They are connected so well, that people can walk from one to the next, as if it is the same boat.

I’m sure you see what I’m getting at.

You can be the one who drops anchor first. Knowing yourself, gives you the wisdom to lead others, connecting them in ways they never would have dreamed. You can be the building block of your group, keeping the balance, advising through equal tension, keeping space for everyone who wants to join. This is what community can look like.

And if you don’t see yourself as the anchor, maybe it’s your friend who you’ve been sharing your journey with. I love the picture of coming up alongside another boat, and tying yourself to them tightly. It’s a statement of “where you go, I will go. Whatever may come, I will be beside you. We belong together.”

If that’s not beautiful community, I don’t know what is.

“People are most impacted by being known and accepted.”

Let someone know today, that you see them, that they matter, and that they are loved and known by you. Think of how big your “boat party” could stretch if you begin with an open heart and a hand outstretched in kindness.

I hope these 3 tips help you engage better in your own personal communities, and that your life is enriched along the journey.

Blessings!

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Interested in learning more about the enneagram and sharing it with others?

Check out these beautiful print outs below. There is one for each type, or you can grab the bundle of all nine types! These are available to you as instant digital downloads, so you can start using them right away!

Grab the whole set! Great for sharing with friends or groups!

How do you make decisions based on your enneagram type?

Have you ever thought about what goes into making a decision? It happens automatically. We make thousands of decisions everyday, without giving much thought to the process. Did you know that even how you make decisions is based on your enneagram type? Let’s dive in to the realm of decision making, and why we decide the way we do.

Firstly, it’s important to know what the word “decide” really means.

The word, decide, basically means, “to kill off.”

Does this surprise you?

Let’s go deeper. The first part of the word (or the prefix) “de,” simply means “off.” But the other part of the word, “cide,” is found in words like: homicide, suicide, and genocide, and means “to cut,” or “kill.” So together we come up with a succinct definition: “to kill off.”

Does this definition ring true for you and your experience of deciding? Do you think about decisions as killing off all the other options, and moving forward in the direction you have chosen?

Whether you think of it this way or not, this is actually what is happening when you decide something. When you say “yes” to one thing, it means you are saying “no” to something else. You are “cutting off” other opportunities in order to give your, “yes.” This is the cost of making a decision.

Now how does the enneagram come into play with decision making?

Our decisions are closely related with our key motivations and how we process information. Each enneagram type will subconsciously follow a pattern of decision making based on these two components. If you are looking to improve your decision making habits, this is a great place to start. By being aware of our patterns, we can then decide to change them. So how do you make decisions based on your enneagram type?

Enneagram Type 1

When it comes to decision making for ones, they want to make the right choice. This is the key motivation behind almost every decision that a type one makes. They are usually pretty quick decision makers, and know instinctively what the right choice is, based on their own set of personal standards and systems they have set up for themselves.

However, they can get into trouble with how they process information. Ones are primarily anchored to the present, and also have a repressed thinking intelligence center. This means that ones can get stuck in their head, over-thinking, or over-criticizing themselves and the decision.

Enneagram Type 2

Twos are greatly motivated by how received they are by others. This impacts their decision making because they want to please the people around them, as well as receive their love and approval. They make most decisions based on the perceived needs of others, and rarely consider their own wants or desires.

This self-neglect gets them into trouble. They might even end up resenting others for not reciprocating care.

Enneagram Type 3

Threes are motivated by success, or even the appearance of success. This influences their decision making by what they allow, and do t allow. They are also extremely driven, and value efficiency, which adds another element into decisions.

If the decision reflects well on them, helps them achieve their goals, and can be done effectively – it is a definite yes for threes.

They get into trouble when decisions become more about pretense, than authenticity. Deception can look grey to threes, as long as they are getting the results they want, they may be unaware at what cost.

Enneagram Type 4

Fours are motivated by deep longings to be significant. This colors their decisions through self-expression, as well as how they show up in the world. Fours would never want to appear fake or phony. Their decisions center around their truth and their own identities.

However, fours get stuck in the decision making process of actually moving forward. Since fours are anchored to the past (being in the withdrawn stance) they have trouble moving into action. Fours are “doing repressed.” They are great about dreaming up fanciful ideas, and beautiful plans, but sometimes the follow through just isn’t there.

Enneagram Type 5

Fives are motivated by a desire to be capable, as well as to gain knowledge. Their decision making process involves extensive research, as well as logically processing, and thinking through how well they can prepare. Fives are usually steady decision makers who don’t take risks. They are measured, and weigh out possible outcomes.

Similarly to type fours, fives are in the withdrawn stance and sometimes struggle with taking a plan into action. They love the research part of decision making, and may spend all their time dedicated to learning more and more about the current topic. Fives are not quick decision makers, and need time to process feelings and facts around the decision.

Enneagram Type 6

Sixes are motivated by security and safety. They are also concerned with what is best for the whole group. These motivations are at the core of how sixes make decisions. Will it be safe? Will everyone benefit from the decision? Sixes want to make sure their decisions will be supported, as well as connecting in a relational way.

However, sixes get stuck in over-thinking and anxiety when it comes to making a decision. They doubt themselves, and their own instincts toward making the right decision. They will often seek guidance outside themselves before making a decision, asking a trusted friend, or looking up answers from other trusted sources.

Enneagram Type 7

Sevens are motivated by satisfaction, and enjoyment. They are usually up for anything and always want to be included. When it comes to decision making, their first instinct is, “yes, let’s do it!” They might over-extend themselves, by agreeing to do everything. They are quick decision makers, and clever enough to sometimes make this work for them.

However, sevens may experience burnout easily by taking on too much and doing too much. They need to carefully consider what they are saying yes to. Being in the aggressive stance, sevens are very action oriented, but also feelings repressed. It’s important to slow down, and consider the feelings around decisions.

Enneagram Type 8

Eights are motivated by not being controlled, and by justice. They are quick decision makers, and know instinctively what needs done, and they do it. This type has confidence in their decision making skills and has no trouble telling others what the decision is. It is easy for them to see clearly, without a lot of time needed for discussion, or planning.

However, eights sometimes bulldoze over others in their quick powerful decisions. They are also in the aggressive stance, meaning they take in the world through instincts/ the body, and support their decisions with thinking; completely skipping over feelings. Some of their decision making also occurs as a result of them not wanting to be controlled.

Enneagram Type 9

Nines are motivated by inner and outer peace. They might have the hardest time with the decision making process. Nines often “merge” with those around them, agreeing to what everyone else wants in order to keep the peace. They also have a hard time prioritizing actions. All tasks and decision can look of equal importance to a type nine.

Nines are in the withdrawn stance, which looks like distraction for them. Instead of doing the important task, or making that important decision, a type nine might keep busy doing other things instead of those main tasks. This shows their tendency toward being “doing repressed,” and greatly affects their decision making. A reminder app, or special “to do” planner can be helpful for nines.

Wasn’t that fun? I hope you enjoyed learning about how each enneagram type handles the decision making process. We are all so different! Isn’t it fascinating?

Want to know more about each enneagram type?

Check out the 9 types enneagram packet.

This packet includes a page for each enneagram type, covering all the basics to understand that type!

Bring the enneagram to your group! Start seeing better connections, more compassion for each other, and clear understanding.

The enneagram improves relationships of all kinds.

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Harry Potter and The Enneagram (Types 8 & 9)

The Harry Potter series is full of dynamic characters with fully developed personalities… and enneagram types! This is what makes delving into the Harry Potter world so much fun! Today, we are going to spend some time talking specifically about Harry Potter and the enneagram types 8 & 9!

Enneagram Type 8: Delores Umbridge

The key thing to know about eights, is that they are motivated by not wanting to be controlled. This key motivation pushes them to in turn control others, if they are in a place of power and control, no one can have power and control over them.

We see this hunger for power in the character of Delores Umbridge. She deeply fears showing weakness, wearing armor of pink and shields of pretensive sweetness. Unlike a type 3, who could pull off a clever façade, Umbridge fools no one with her “air of fake likeability.” Because we know their is no authenticity of goodness behind her actions, everything about her becomes sour.

Umbridge is an example of an enneagram type eight that has gone way below the level of average to an unhealthy state. She is full of anger, that overflows into cruelty. The more power she gains, the more evil she becomes. This power hungry appetite cannot be filled. she becomes like an evil dictator, completely closed off to all emotions and feelings, that would otherwise steer here in a healthy direction, she moves forward to rule demanding that she is on top.

In the un-healthy stage of a type eight, we see Umbridge as reckless, ruthless, suspicious, and seeking revenge. She demands that her way is the only way, and that all must follow. Her attempt to not be controlled, however, doesn’t end up working out for her. As we know, ignoring our personal health and growth will only get us in a deeper pit.

Enneagram Type 8 Professor Alastor (Mad-Eye) Moody

Now we can compare degrees of health within the same enneagram type. Professor Alastor Moody is also an enneagram type eight, yet he is in an average, and sometimes healthy state within his type. He is confrontational, and bold, but not cruel. Mad-Eye is self-sufficient, and a dualistic thinker, but he also know how to make a group inspired to follow him.

Eights make natural leaders because they don’t mind taking charge and being in control. The difference here is earned respect (For Moody) and demanding obedience out of fear (from Umbridge). Mad-Eye shows his great leadership as he guides the Order of the Phoenix through many a turbulent time, and as an Auror he is respected, looked up to, and even awed.

He understands the power of vulnerability, and has learned to put his guard down around those he trusts. Though he often dominates his environment, he also looks out for those who need his help. Most of the time he speaks his mind boldly, but at times he restrains himself, when he sees the outcome will be better if he holds back.

Enneagram Type 9: Harry Potter

Firstly, I don’t think any other type on the enneagram could have survived living with the Dursleys! And Harry’s humanity is always shining through in effort to be a good person, to keep things peaceful, and amicable. Time and time again, it is Harry who offers the olive branch to these people who treat him so unkindly.

Secondly, a key component of enneagram type nine is their tendency to merge with others. They sort of go along with whatever the person they are with wants to do. Harry does this frequently. Hermione is often the one with all the ideas, and he just sort of agrees, trusting that she is both intelligent, and faithful. He gets placed in many scenarios, that other numbers would simply back out of, say no to, or refuse to comply.

Harry is also, just a really likeable kid. Nines are known to be the easiest number to be around. They don’t bring their own baggage, never bring up conflict, and usually just support you. Harry really wants the best for his friends, and for the world. He isn’t too concerned with his own desires, or pursuing lofty dreams.

Furthermore, One of the great things about the series taking place over so many years, is that we get to see Harry really grow up as a character. In the beginning, he is really fighting, as all nines do, the idea that his presence matters. He doesn’t connect with being “the chosen one… the boy who lived.” And he never likes the idea of being famous. As the series progresses, we see him blossom into the kind of leader others want to follow.

Harry begins to see that he has a lot offer others, and becomes a great teacher to those who want to learn true defense against the dark arts. He faces many conflicts that previously he may have tried to avoid. Most importantly he connects with himself authentically, and faces the ultimate fear, death.

Enneagram Type 9: Professor Dumbledore

Dumbledore is a patient, level-headed leader, and seeks world peace for all. His mediation skills are a big part of what makes him a great type nine leader. He handles many problems with wisdom, calm, and sometimes a little humor that reflect his deep type nine ways.

He is a withdrawn type, which makes him feel somewhat distant at times. Dumbledore uses his reflections about the past (where he is anchored due to his stance) to inform him about present decisions. You can literally see the weight lifted, when he releases a memory into the pensieve. Allowing a heavy thought to be taken away, gives energy back.

As a body/ gut type, Dumbledore is very intuitive. He knows things going on all around him just by instinct. In a single room, he can detect the most minute feelings and actions. This triad also means, his anger is just under the surface. We rarely see it, and when we do, he didn’t even know it was coming. And he’d probably tell you that he doesn’t get angry.

Thanks for reading!

It was such fun taking a closer look at these Harry Potter characters to discover their enneagram types!

Who is your favorite Harry Potter character?

What enneagram type are they?

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I hope you are enjoying learning about the enneagram and that it is helping you better understand yourself and others in your life! It is always my goal to inspire growth and personal development to my readers!

If you are interested in enneagram materials like the ones below, visit the shop link or

Someone needs to read this poster today!

Be reminded that it’s okay…

Since we talked about enneagram type nines today, I thought I would share this type nine motivation sheet. Understanding motivations really is the key to understanding the enneagram and in turn, each person. Find all the types motivation sheets like the one below in the shop!

Harry Potter and The Enneagram (types 5, 6, &7)

We are continuing our series on Harry Potter and the enneagram with types 5, 6, & 7! I am enjoying this series extensively and I hope you are too! Seeing the types through fictional characters often helps us see ourselves more clearly, and others too. It’s that aha moment of, “ oh, so that’s what a type 5 is like!”

Severus Snape: Type 5

I see Professor Snape as a classic Enneagram Type 5. He is one of the most skilled and educated wizards of his time. His extensive research and knowledge/love of knowing, “how to bottle death,” etc. show his dedication and five-like qualities. There isn’t a potion too challenging for him, or an herb he doesn’t know. Snape is more than “book smart.” Remember, he’s the half-blood prince?

Type five falls into the withdrawn stance on the enneagram. This means that Snape and all fives, are looking back in the past, dwelling on things gone. We definitely see this with Snape. His whole life is about the past. Promises he made to those long gone, wrongs done to him, and memories both good and torturous are what occupy his present.

He doesn’t allow himself to get close to anyone, keeping his heart guarded and his emotions locked away. His dedication is to the cause, the only thing he has left of the one he loves.

Neville Longbottom: Type 5

Neville Longbottom, a favorite if mine, becomes obsessed with Herbology. Fives often choose a topic at a time and go deep until they know everything there is to know about it. Neville is found in the library among the plant books, and has received high praise from Professor Sprout, the Herbology teacher. He excels in this class because it becomes a passion and curiosity for him which he must learn to the best of his ability.

Fives are also known to be rule followers. Neville abides by the rules, and expects others to also. When he discovers Ron, Hermione,and Harry sneaking out after curfew, he demands that they stop breaking rules. He’s also concerned about them as a whole, Gryfindor House, losing house points due to the rule breaking.

Lastly, fives tend to be observers rather than joiners. they have a keen understanding for things going on around them, but prefer remaining in the outside. This distance from others is a way to keep themselves safe, as well as preserve energy.

Remus Lupin: Type 6

In general, Remus Lupin is just a “likable” guy. He’s authentic, doesn’t try too hard, and actually cares about teaching the students. He is well prepared, practical, and responsible. These are all typical six qualities, and make him a great teacher.

The Fear Triad (head triad)

Professor Lupin lives out of a unique type on fear. He is hiding the fact that he is a Werewolf, and he fears above all else, losing control and hurting others. He can’t trust himself, because he actually becomes something dangerous. This feels very six-ish. But don’t let the Werewolf identity muddy the waters too much.

Being in the fear/head triad, Lupin is hyper-vigilant at times, defensive, and at his worst, self-defeating and rigid. He has good intentions, but is wary of things he can’t trust or control.

Loyalty

The type six is well known for this trait of loyalty. Lupin has this in spades. In every inner circle he is a part of, he shows nothing but loyalty to the group. From James Potter’s group of friends growing up together, to The Order of the Phoenix, to Hogwarts, and to Harry and his family, Lupin is a constant grounded pillar of dependency and trustworthiness. He obviously holds this standard as the highest of values.

In addition to his loyalty, Lupin is also compassionate, witty, and supportive. It makes sense why he was relied upon as a friend, leader, and teacher. He gives Harry hope and direction when he needs it; he is the friend and leader that stands up with preparation when others are not ready.

Ron Weasley: Type 6

Similarly to Professor Lupin, Ron Weasley showcases loyalty as his best quality. He becomes fast friends with Harry, and instantly is dependable and thoughtful. Throughout the series, Ron is reliable, steadfast, and stands up for his friends.

As a head type, we see him use his critical thinking skills many times to get the trio out of a tough spot. In the first book, we see it in the “best game of wizards chess ever played!” He sees what needs to be done and takes action.

Other times, his doubts, anxieties and fears get the best of him. The forbidden forest with the spiders, the devil’s snare that he just can’t relax into, are both perfect examples. Sixes are known for “over-thinking.” Being smack in the middle of the head triad, makes Ron especially prone to taking in information with thinking and getting stuck there.

Sirius Black: Type 7

Sirius seeks the most out of every situation. He hates being alone, as most sevens do, and has the advantage of turning into a dog whenever he wants. I think all sevens would love this idea! Dogs represent much of what a seven is all about: joy, companionship, and adventures!

FOMO (fear of missing out) is the real deal for type sevens. Sirius risks being seen in dog form in order to say goodbye to Harry. Did I mention sevens are huge risk takers? They are fearless, future oriented thinkers. At their best, they are wise confidants. Harry seeks advice from Sirius numerous times.

The big disconnect for type sevens are emotions. They don’t mind the positive emotions, but anything painful or perceived as harmful to them, sevens avoid at all costs. Sirius went in an opposite direction from his family, but he rarely speaks of it. It’s as if he wants to pretend those hurtful things are not a part of him. Instead, he plunges forward into dangerous heroism in hopes of defeating Voldemort.

Ginny Weasley: Type 7w6

When we first meet Ginny, she presents as an introverted type seven. It is fascinating to see her character grow and blossom throughout the series. As she gains more confidence in herself, she becomes a girl who knows who she is, what she wants, and what she stands for.

She becomes bold, and a striking person that others love to be around. Her quick wit and cleverness make her a type seven (with a type six wing). Though she’s not quite “the life of the party” like some sevens, her six wing makes her a bit more cautious. Her core desire is for contentment. She adds balance to “Dumbledore’s Army,” and is charming, productive, and enthusiastic.

I hope you enjoyed my take on these Harry Potter characters! Thanks for reading! I would love to hear your thoughts. Who are your favorite characters? What type do you think they are?

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Want to know about your type? This overview packet is ideal for getting a handle on all 9 types! Take a look!

Fall Daydreaming

I’ve been “Fall Daydreaming,” for weeks, but now that it’s around the corner, I just can’t wait! It’s my favorite season! And to celebrate, I’ve made a fun Fall Checklist to share with you!

Grab your FREE Fall Checklist Here!

Mark one thing off your list by reading the poem below.

October

BY ROBERT FROST

O hushed October morning mild,

Thy leaves have ripened to the fall;

Tomorrow’s wind, if it be wild,

Should waste them all.

The crows above the forest call;

Tomorrow they may form and go.

O hushed October morning mild,

Begin the hours of this day slow.

Make the day seem to us less brief.

Hearts not averse to being beguiled,

Beguile us in the way you know.

Release one leaf at break of day;

At noon release another leaf;

One from our trees, one far away.

Retard the sun with gentle mist;

Enchant the land with amethyst.

Slow, slow!

For the grapes’ sake, if they were all,

Whose leaves already are burnt with frost,

Whose clustered fruit must else be lost—

For the grapes’ sake along the wall.

The image above looks like pure October bliss!!!

Speaking of October Bliss… I would love for you to be part of our Enneagram Fall Wellness Retreat!

It’s going to be a blast! 3 days and 2 nights of enneagram workshops, great food, yoga, meditation, nature walks, and relaxing in a beautiful boutique hotel!

Check out the Retreat info here!

Short and sweet today, my friends! I just wanted to put some positivity out! I hope you enjoy the Fall Freebie! And more importantly, I hope the beginning to your Fall Season is a beautiful transition… a time when we are reminded that change is good for us!

Live inspired!

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Harry Potter and the Enneagram (types 3&4)

Harry Potter and the Enneagram (types 3 &4)

Fictional characters really help us get a handle on what an enneagram type might look like. Though typing fictional characters isn’t always accurate, its a fun way to see the enneagram types in a different light. This week, we are focusing on Harry Potter and the enneagram (types 3&4)! Let’s take a look at who in the Harry Potter Series represents these two types well, and what we can learn from them.

Draco Malfoy: Enneagram Type 3

Unfortunately, we see many qualities of the darker side of type three come out in Draco Malfoy. It begins innocent enough with typical grade school competition, but Draco quickly moves into a space of making everything about being “the best,” no matter the cost. He is willing to step others, exclude others, and actually hurt others to achieve his goals.

When famous Harry Potter turns down a friendship with Draco, it intensifies his already competitive spirit. He assumed Harry would automatically buddy up to him. Maybe, he even had visions of the future, of them being the leaders of the pack together. Some of that fame may have looked good on him. However instead, Draco is humiliated (something that enrages type 3) in front of everyone, and an arch enemy in born.

Types threes are defined by their success or their failure, and feel an immense amount of pressure keeping these to opposites in balance. We know that much is expected of Draco from his family, especially his Father. He only feels accepted or loved through performing well, which is compounded over time, causing him to double down in hopes to live up to achieving what is expected of him.

James Potter: Enneagram Type 3

Similarly to Draco Malfoy, James Potter was also a very charming and competitive character. He was very popular, and well liked by most, although he had a mischievous streak that often got out of hand. He led his group of friends to taunt and teas Severus Snape, merely because he could. Under the surface, we see motivations of wanting to show others that he was better, had power, and could do whatever he wanted.

His character matures and begins to change after his relationship with Lily gets serious. She is the influencing force that brings out the good in him. Those same characteristics that led his friends in school, developed into leading others in war against evil. James’ confidence, enthusiasm, and focus are what made him an excellent leader during the fight against Voldemort.

Type threes are often in leadership roles because others are naturally drawn to them. The tricky thing is not letting that go their heads. Threes have a hard time being honest with themselves at times, especially in the intelligence center of feelings. As long as they’re performing well, threes can ignore important things that are going on inside, or with their relationships.

Moaning Myrtle: Enneagram Type 4

Moaning Myrtle is the ghost that hangs around in the girl’s bathroom… the very place she died. It’s like she is reliving her death over and over, and soaking in all the melancholy, deep feelings that tie her to that place. In true type four fashion, she’s totally fine re-living the past (withdrawn stance) and sort of wallowing in all the wrongs that have been done to her.

When she gets the chance, she talks to some of the students about the tragedy of her death. And even says statements like:

“I was just sitting in the U-bend, thinking about death…”

Moaning Myrtle

Not only is Moaning Myrtle in touch with her feelings, but she is temperamental, individualist, romantic, and a little bit quirky. She enjoys the fact that she is a mysterious being, and surrounding her death is a huge secret. She will never be seen as she truly is, because she’s now a ghost. A type four longs to be seen, known, and understood. They spend most of their lives feeling out of place, different, and like they don’t belong.

Furthermore, fours have a longing for what is missing, and become easily envious of others. This is played out so well in the character of Moaning Myrtle. She literally can’t have anything that the rest of the characters have. Myrtle missed out on much of her life, and now she is stuck watching everyone do things she can’t do. This abandoned feeling is an emotion fours relate to well.

I hope you enjoyed reading about these Harry Potter characters and what their enneagram types explain about them!

Who are your favorite characters? What type do you think they are?

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Harry Potter and The Enneagram

Seeing the enneagram through fictional characters is a really fun way to allow ourselves to look deeply at the enneagram types. It takes the pressure off of ourselves, and opens up a new way of seeing, especially when it is characters we know well. Since our enneagram and Fictional Characters series has been one of our most popular, we decided to dig deeper into Harry Potter and the enneagram, specifically.

This series will cover many of the characters from Harry Potter and the various enneagram types they could be perceived to represent. Today, let’s look at types one and two.

Enneagram Type One

Professor Minerva McGonagall

At first glance, Professor McGonagall appears rigid; a stern giver of rules and order at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. It’s true, type ones feel an enormous responsibility to how things should be run, and that there is in fact a right way to do everything. They are also motivated to improve things in every area, making type ones like McGonagall terrific candidates for the teacher role.

Professor McGonagall has the unique position to spot good in others and push them to embrace and realize it. She spots greatness in Harry, not only as a potentially superb Quidditch player, but also as someone who can take on challenges far above the average student in the magical world.

The core desire of type one is to attain and keep integrity. They not only want to do good, and be good, but they also want others to realize this about them. This goal falls into perfectionism for types like McGonagall. They are very self critical, and expect the highest from themselves as well as others.

“I assure you that if you die, you need not hand it in.”

Professor McGonagall

Hermione Granger

“There is a RIGHT way and a WRONG way to do everything.”

Ones like Hermione Granger, can be great leaders. They are known to have a solid moral compass, and care deeply about doing what is right in all scenarios. As Hermione shows best, they are the ideal student as well. A type one wouldn’t dream of turning in an assignment late, or breaking a rule. However, if justice is at stake, a “Hermione” just might decide its worth the trade off.

What does Hermione want from her friends?

Ones value honesty above all. Hermione doesn’t like games, or not saying what you mean. She needs Harry and Ron to give it to her straight. Justice and integrity are a close second for what she values most. Doing what is right, earns points in her book!

Speaking of books… we know Hermione is the Queen of reading! She expects her friends to meet her in this way too (though we know Hary and Ron fall short)! I mean who wouldn’t want to read “Hogwarts, A History!”

Hermione expects to be treated with fairness. She seeks to be an “equal player” in everything. She accepts nothing that she doesn’t earn. Though ones like Hermione can be supremely independent, they long for the connection of true friendships, and are great at being in the present moment.

The last thing Hermione needs from her friends, is the reminder to relax and have some fun! She can be too serious, and needs to loosen up. Remember: Ones share a line with type 7 (The entertaining enthusiast) This means they have access to the type that cares most about fun! Ones need to reach out for this point. It feeds them in a special way and makes them sigh with relief at putting down some of their responsibilities.

Enneagram Types Two of Harry Potter

Mrs. Weasley

harry potter and the enneagram

“How DARE you steal that car!”

Molly Weasley

Molly represents type 2 well with her warm gift of hospitality and care. Twos are known as “the helpers.” From the first time we meet Molly, she is helping Harry make it through platform nine and three quarters for the very first time. She serves her family and nurtures them with love and generosity.

Molly makes the Burrow feel like the kind of place any kid would want to grow up in. It’s quirky and comfy, yet meals are had together, and everyone has what they need most. Everyone who visits is received with a hug and brought lovingly into her space.

She also displays 2 characteristics as she interacts with the members of The Order of the Phoenix. She is still the tower of comfort and support, the warmth in the dark and confusing moments.

Type 2 is also known for their compassion, adaptability, and empathy. Molly clearly reads the emotions of others and acts accordingly. Though sometimes she might help “too” much, which is common with twos.

Her boldness comes from her connection to type 8. Twos and eights share a line, allowing Molly to lash at at moments of overwhelm or extreme emotion. The moment we hear her voice in the howler Ron receives about stealing the car, is a great example.

Hagrid

Our friendly, lovable Hagrid is also an enneagram type two. He displays the type twos core desire of wanting to be loved for who they are. Hagrid is often misplaced and misunderstood. He finds his own way to nurture through taking care of animals and the famous three.

At his best, Hagrid is kind, caring, and sacrifices for others. He took the blame for a crime he didn’t commit, and was never truly rectified after this event. As an unjustified outcast, he just wants to show love and care to others.

He often doesn’t think of the consequences of his choices to take on more and more creatures to care for. Many of them end up being extremely dangerous, but he inly sees the good, and the care that he will give them as well as the love he gets in return from these animals.

Hagrid is always willing to help. You’ve got slugs shooting out your mouth? Hagrid is there for you. You need someone to talk to about a friend problem? Hagrid will listen. Need an escort through the forbidden forest? He is at your side.

What do Hagrid and Molly need from others?

APPRECIATION!!!

Type twos need to hear that what they have done for you mattered. They pour into the people around them, and they need to know that you recognize their effort and hard work.

Twos also want you to listen to them once in a while. They are used to being on the receiving end of everyone else’s problems, but they have problems too! Be a good listener!

Also, they hate criticism. Give it to them softly and surrounded by compliments!

Thanks for reading the beginning post of Harry Potter and the Enneagram! I hope you enjoyed this! More types are on their way!

Live Inspired!

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What is Your Hazard

Hey there! It’s officially road trip season, and I know a lot of you are anxious to get out there. Maybe some of you are heading for high elevations. Have you ever driven in the mountains with high rock formations, and you see those signs, “Hazard ahead, look out for falling rocks?” This situation can be really dangerous, right? Today, we are talking about the hazards in your life that keep you from getting where you want to go and how the enneagram both defines these hazards, and gives us a road map to work around them.

what is your hazard?

It’s not the rocks themselves that are dangerous. A rock is just a rock. I like this analogy because it allows us to see the power of perspective. None of our personal hazards are dangerous all on their own, it’s the power and perspective we give them, and the situations we allow to form around them, that make them so dangerous.

Using the enneagram, we can define our hazard through our core number. This will be the trap that you continually find yourself in. The pattern of your core number keeps bringing you back to this self destructive behavior and situation that doesn’t serve you well. The key to getting out of this trap is by connecting with your strength number and the high virtues you have access to through that number.

Let’s look at some examples.

Type one

One’s hazard has to do with control. Their key motivation is to be good, also meaning they don’t want to be bad. This might seem over simple, but it is full of complication. They feel like if they can keep out anything labeled as “bad,” they won’t be corrupted by it, therefore keeping them preserved, and good. Are you seeing the blind spot here? This is an impossible feat. No one can be fully good and keep out all wrong.

Type One’s Strength Number: Seven

The road map for type one means connecting to the high side of seven. The virtue one’s need to strive for is sobriety. This is the acceptance of “what is.” Not wanting things to be better, more, or different. There is a peaceful balance here that gets one’s out of their cycle to improve and control. They realize they have control of very little in reality, and there is a gift in understanding that balance.

Type Two:

Two’s hazard is around acceptance and needing to be liked or loved. Doesn’t everyone want to be liked or loved? Well, yes, but none of us hold a candle to the deep need of the type two for this acceptance. They will go beyond boundaries and logic to please others, subconsciously wanting a reciprocal love and helpfulness to come their way. Their challenge is keeping boundaries, and authenticity. Their blind spot lies in overstepping and saying yes to everything and everyone.

Type Two’s strength number: Four

The road map for type two means connecting to the high side of type four. Fours might just be the most authentic type on the enneagram. Twos need to key into this as well as the awareness fours have around their own emotions and feelings. They can also connect to the fours ability to have good boundaries based on that genuineness. The best decisions can be made when a two knows how they feel and what is theirs to do.

Type Three:

Three’s hazard is around self-importance and their blind spot has to do with succeeding at all costs. They are efficient and block out feelings to get things done. Just like every number, a strength easily becomes a weakness when it is in excess. Three’s can trend toward workaholism, doing only what will allow them to win or reach their goal.

Type Three’s Strength Number: Six

The road map for type three means leaning into the best qualities of type six. These include: loyalty, steadfastness, faithfulness, and compassion. When type three can let go of their success mask, and pick up truth and loyalty, they will avoid many hazards on their way. Slowing down, is key for threes. Dare I say it: being unproductive is okay! Threes need to learn to sit with feelings, their own, as well as others, allowing them to have both self compassion and compassion for others.

Type Four:

The hazard for type four, is focusing too much on what is missing. Fours are idealistic, and want things to be a certain way. They instantly notice what they don’t have, what they are not, and get stuck in a cycle of comparing and feelings. All the while, fours truly miss out. Life is happening around them, but they can’t seem to get out of their inner world, that tells them they aren’t enough, they need to be more special, more like…

Type Four’s Strength Number: One

The road map for type four is through the high side of type one. The structure, follow-thru, and dependability of type one lends stability to the type four. Through type one, fours can find clarity, and also a path to get thing done. They move away from comparison syndrome, and into a place of realism and serenity.

Type Five:

The hazard for type five centers around independence, capability, and personal boundaries. These characteristics on their own seem quite positive, but like we’ve said, attributes can easily become unbalanced. This is why we experience hazards in our lives. Fives in particular, become overly guarded and closed off. They want to figure everything out for themselves without allowing for help. This hazard keeps fives from interaction, as well as relying solely on themselves for everything.

Type Five’s Strength Number: Eight

The road map for five’s is through the powerhouse of type eight. This positive move from five to eight allows fives to be direct about how they feel, and ask for what they need. It also activates the doing center for fives, who often stay for long periods of time in the planning, thinking, reminiscing stage. Eights are known for action, as well as their boldness. This brings fives back into balance, and actually helps them connect better with others as they are communicating needs, and desires.

Type Six:

The hazard for sixes has to do with anxiety and over-thinking. Sixes are motivated by security, and tend to spiral into worst-case scenario thinking, or over-thinking in general. A major blind spot for sixes is doubting themselves. This hazard affects every area of their lives and decision making. “But what if…” is constantly just under the surface for sixes. They are always wondering, and planning for everything.

Type Six’ Strength Number: Nine

The road map for type six is through the peacemaker- type nine. Going to the high side of nine feels like a soothing remedy to sixes anxious mind. To let go of the worry, and embrace the easy going attitude of type nines is so healing. The “what ifs,” are gone, there is a calm acceptance that everything will be okay. The peacefulness of nine allows sixes to get out of their heads and into their bodies, to feel the reality that 80% of the the things they worry about NEVER happen!

Type Seven:

Seven’s hazard is around avoiding feelings, and fear of missing out. The kings of stuffing feelings might just be the type seven. It’s not fun to feel those feelings sometimes, so why not just pretend they aren’t there and distract yourself with something exciting? Yes, sevens fall prey to this unhealthy distraction tactic and many others that allow them to not feel the pain of deep feelings. Another blind spot is around FOMO (fear of missing out). If there is fun to be had, a seven wants to be there no matter how reckless or ill-timed the event may be.

Type Seven’s Strength Number: Five

The road map for seven’s is through the high side of type five. This move grounds type seven, and helps them establish healthy boundaries. They stop saying “yes,” to everything, and start considering time to with drawl alone as something to look forward to. The five’s independence, and self-reliance gives seven’s balance, and courage to face some of those hard feelings in their own way.

Type Eight:

The hazard for eights, centers around control, as well as anger. This strong body type does not want to be controlled by anyone, and holds anger right at the surface. Eights speak their minds openly without worrying about whose feelings they might hurt. These blind spots mean they are often in conflicts with others, challenging constantly on every side. Their sharp edges are deceptive however, protecting a deeper vulnerable side that just want to love you.

Type Eight’s Strength Number: Two

The road map for eights is through the high side of type two: the helper. The positive qualities of twos give the eights needed connection to feelings, compassion, and humility. When Eights access type two, they present softer, considering others opinions, and not challenging as frequently. This awareness helps balance type eight, allowing for the possibility of seeing that vulnerable side.

Type Nine:

The hazard for nine is centered around merging, and avoiding conflict. Nines rarely speak their mind, they agree with those they are with, to avoid conflict, when they really might feel differently. This creates a passive aggressive attitude, making problems hard to solve. They desire peace within, and peace outwardly, and will do anything to achieve this. Managing all of this feels impossible to the nine, and they might give up.

Type Nine’s Strength Number: Three

The road map for nines is through the confident type three. When nines lean into the decisive type three, they can speak their mind, say what they mean, and feel comfortable doing it. The three energy also helps nines achieve their goals, and get things done. Type three allows nines to realize that some conflict is good and healthy and it won’t kill them.

Thanks for reading! I hope you enjoyed talking about our hazards. Remember to lean into your strength number to get out of some of those spirals, you really can do it! You always have access to your strength number!

Live inspired and keep growing!

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Beauty and the Beast and the Enneagram

Beauty and the Beast has always been my favorite fairy tale story. A bookish girl who wants more out of life has to make a big moral decision, including sacrifice, vulnerability, and real transformation. The drama and the stakes are high. Which brings me to Beauty and the Beast, and the enneagram!

The drama and transformation in this story lends us ample material to work with when considering the enneagram. I love seeing a character grow throughout a story. It can be a great reflection tool as well for our own growth patterns and archs.

Beauty and The Beast & The Enneagram

The Beast

Enneagram Type 8

“you must control your temper

We meet him first as an unhealthy 8 who speaks before thinking, acts before considering consequences, and makes rash judgments. His anger is right on the surface for all to see.

Then when Belle meets him, he is deeply depressed, and in his state of stress as a guarded type 5. He is withdrawn, guarded and fearful of showing any weakness. Let’s take a moment to understand this major move for the Beast.

Type 8 can take on quite a lot of stress. These are powerful, confident characters. They hold their own, and protect themselves from getting hurt. It is the years of “living cursed,” that drives the beast deep into his stress mode. He isolates himself, becomes private and discouraged. The possibility of a future is nearly hopeless, which is devastating for a future oriented type 8.

The night Belle arrives, things begin to change. He is forced to come out of his seclusion and back up into his core- type 8 self. When she runs away, he goes after her. He protects her and ends up saving her life. This is type eight at it’s best.

Type Eight’s Connection to Type 2

Throughout the story we see the beast developing both the high side of 8 and connection to his strength number- type two. Belle has gained his trust, so he is willing to now be vulnerable with her and show her his softer side. What he fears most as an 8, is betrayal. She helps him overcome this fear by proving to be faithful and trustworthy, honest and compassionate.

What a great example of the growth arch of a character. We really get to see it all with the beast because it is truly a story about transformation.

By the end, he is functioning on the high side of eight and two. The clear leader, yet sensitive to the needs of others. When he literally transforms into the Prince version on himself, there is evident warmth (from type the two side) and a sense of leadership over his castle. It is clear that his employees want what is best for him and respect him.

Belle

Enneagram Type 5

We see right away that Belle does not fit the mold for a typical woman in society. She is intellectual, independent, and doesn’t want to marry, “just to marry.” This alone makes her complicated. She is curious, and capable, breaking expectations once again. In these ways, she represents enneagram type five very classically.

Fives love nothing more than to figure things out for themselves. They are deeply independent, and don’t really need anyone. Resourcefulness is one of their super-powers. We see all of this in Belle.

On the enneagram, type 5 is connected to type seven. This connection may be where Belle gets her longing for adventure and desires beyond the simple life in her quiet village.

We see her love of books and seeking time alone from the beginning. She is always seeking more knowledge, and a way to escape through the stories she reads. A five’s key motivation is gaining knowledge and being capable, which she shows very clearly.

Type Five’s Connection to Eight

When Belle’s Father’s horse, Phillipe, shows up rider-less, she springs into action. She knows she is capable and that she alone must find her father. Her confidence is that of a fives: grounded and logical. She is dependable and does what “should” be done.

Consequently, her exchange in her father’s place as prisoner is not as “martyr-like” as it may seem. It is the logical thing that should be done. Her access to type eight as her strength number allows her to stand up to the Beast, and also protect the one person in her life that she loves.

We see the eight in her rise up on numerous occasions, meeting the challenge of the Beast. This really works beautifully for the dynamics of the eight and five couple. They respect each other, stand up for each other, and build enough trust to allow vulnerability where true growth happens.

I hope you have enjoyed the typing of these fictional characters. Looking closely at fictional characters can help us understand ourselves and others better.

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  • it includes ALL 9 enneagram types
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  • each number has it’s own color and relatable symbol

Enneagram Type 9 and Spiritual Practices

Spiritual practices tie in so effortlessly with the typology of the enneagram. Both have goals of growth, mindfulness, and self-improvement. Pairing a spiritual practice with your specific enneagram type will help you grow the most because there really are practices meant just for you! This week we are talking about enneagram type 9 and spiritual practices.

Firstly, nines will struggle getting started. They fall into the withdrawn stance, meaning they are “doing repressed.” This doesn’t mean that they sit around and do nothing. Nines simply aren’t using their time to do things most productively.

Furthermore, nines will unconciously avoid anything they don’t want to do or that they think will cause “bumps in the road,” or conflict. An up-river spiritual practice may look this way to type nines. These practices are challenging and take intention.

Spiritual Practices for Enneagram Type Nines

Since we know type nine struggles with “doing,” they are in need of a spiritual practice that gets them moving. Connecting with their bodies with a practice like yoga, or barre. Nines are also naturally lovers of nature, so another great recommendation would be a nature hike. Moving and doing while connecting.

Awareness

Awareness is something we all need to work on. In fact, that is one of the greatest benefits of the enneagram: more awareness. This understanding of ourselves is truly a gift. But how do we get this higher awareness?

Nines especially need to practice awareness questions. They are used to merging with those they love, or whomever they are with. Merging and being agreeable constantly, makes it hard to know how you really feel and what you really need.

Ask yourself these questions:

Who am I?

What do I believe?

What do I want?

What do I need?

What do I need to say yes to?

What do I need to say no to?

Schedule a time everyday to reflect in this sort of way. Catch yourself when you are agreeing just to agree, when you really feel differently. Aim to separate your identity from those around you. Get to know the you you are, when you’re alone.

I hope these spiritual practice ideas for type nines helps to inspire you.

This has been such a fun series thinking through spiritual practices along side the enneagram. I hope you have enjoyed it as well.

Let us know what spiritual practice you have adopted!

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