Enneagram Type 9 and Fictional Characters

Enneagram type nines are known as the peacemakers. They desire both external peace and internal peace, and will do anything in attempts to protect either one. Let’s look at enneagram type 9 and fictional characters to give us something to grasp at.

Dorthy Gale

Dorthy feels deeply that her presence doesn’t matter (the childhood message of enneagram type 9) which motivates her to run away. She wants to go to a place peaceful and pleasant… over the rainbow.

When she arrives in OZ, she moves from fear to merging with the plans and ideas of those in munchkin land. Glenda and the munchkins simply tell her what to do, and she follows their idea. Along the way, her type 9 generosity and kindness flourish as she meets and assists multiple characters.

Dorthy helps the Scare Crow down from his post, and invites him along on the journey. The same thing happens with the Tin Man and the Cowardly Lion. The type nine’s peaceful presence is great at creating community and becoming what is needed for the group.

Dorthy craves both inner stability and peace of mind. She also exemplifies many other type nine qualities such as: her patience, her friendliness, her go-along-to-get-along attitude, and at times her stubbornness.

She shines as a type nine when she stands up for her friends. Nines will rarely stand up for themselves, but they find themselves mediating and helping others with problems many times.

Harry Potter

enneagram type 9 and fictional characters

Harry Potter is raised by people who literally tell him that his presence doesn’t matter. This message stays with him forever, making him a classic enneagram type nine. Even though he learns that he is a famous wizard, this doesn’t go to his head. He wants peace inwardly and outwardly, and is willing to go after it. Harry most likely has an eight wing influencing some of his rebellious, and bold actions.

Why we like nines

Some of the best nine qualities are exemplified in Harry Potter. He is generous, accepting, empathetic, and open-minded. After only knowing Ron Weasley a short while, Harry eagerly buys “the lot” of sweets on the Hogwarts Express to share with Ron.

Harry is easily likable, and not because he’s famous. He is truly a kind kid who makes others feel welcomed and accepted. Seeing more than one side of things is also one of Harry’s type nine superpowers, as well as being quite diplomatic. All of these qualities begin to blossom in big ways in The Order of the Phoenix with the beginning of Dumbledore’s Army, and a calling to make hard choices for Harry.

Type 9 and weaknesses

We see a classic take of the type nine’s conflict avoidance in book four, Goblet of Fire, when Ron and Harry aren’t speaking to each other. The boys talk to each other through mutual friends, and everything is very passive aggressive.

Nines are also known for being procrastinators. We see Harry often putting off homework assignments for things he’d rather do, and getting distracted constantly by the magical things happening around him.

Easy Going Harry

Just under the surface, the type nine holds a place of constant optimism. It’s as if they are silently saying the mantra, “all will be well,” and they really believe this. They don’t attach themselves to outcomes, or worry about things not working out. Throughout the books, Harry has this quiet confidence. He knows things will work out even when he seems to be staring death in the face. (or literally is… he is still at peace with it).

Thank you for reading! I hope you enjoyed my take on these two classic characters as enneagram type nines.

Do you have a favorite enneagram type 9 fictional character? I would love to hear about your favorites!

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Enneagram Type 8 and Fictional Characters

Enneagram type eights are known for their natural leadership qualities and abilities to get things done without emotions getting in the way. To give you a better idea of what that might look like, let’s explore enneagram type 8 and fictional characters.

Mad-Eye Moody (From the Harry Potter Series)

First of all, are we talking Mad-eye Moody when we first meet him as Barty Crouch Jr., or the real Mad- eye Moody? For typing sake, let’s focus on the real Mad-eye Moody and leave Barty out of it.

A true type eight doesn’t care what others think of them and has a strong pull for justice. Mad-eye is a famous Auror, which in the magical world is sort of like being an FBI agent for the good guys. Mad-Eye has been wounded many times in his service to the common good, which accounts for his menacing appearance.

His limp and his scars don’t slow him down, nor does he care what others think of him. In the true eight nature, Mad-eye stays on track, focused on the goal without worrying how he looks or how anyone feels. He gets things done efficiently, and leads in a commanding way that demands respect.

Along with his leadership skills are his values to protect the innocent, the underdog, and those he loves, or is loyal to. Mad-Eye won’t put up with bullies, big or small. He even defends those being bullied. We see that Mad-eye fights to the death for what he believes in, protecting Harry and the cause.

Katniss Everdeen (The Hunger Games)

Katniss becomes the leader of her family after her father dies. This is typical of the type eight. When no one is taking charge, an eight will rise up and do what needs to be done. She provides food for the family by hunting, and creates a seemingly “safe” space for her sister to feel taken care of.

Furthermore, Katniss shines in a real type eight hero moment, when she volunteers to fight to the death in place of her sister. This moment comes from her type eight gut reaction to protect a dear loved one. There is no way she can let her little sister enter the games where she will most likely die.

Her rising leadership throughout the hunger games books is never about the spotlight, but always about justice. Katniss doesn’t care what she is supposed to do, but breaks the rules for what is right ,or often to protect others.

On the outside she appears cold and unemotional, but we know that underneath her hard type eight shell there is a softer side. Eights protect this above all else. They never want to be seen as weak or vulnerable. Throughout the series, Katniss learns that the only way to true connection is through vulnerability.

Who is your favorite type eight fictional character?

Thanks for reading! I hope you enjoyed my take on these type eights!

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Enneagram type 7 and fictional characters

Wondering what an enneagram type seven might look like? To give you an idea, we’re going to take a look at enneagram type 7 and fictional characters. This type is entertaining, fun, and future oriented! Let’s jump right in!

Jamie Fraser (from Outlander)

Enneagram Type 7 and fictional characters

Jamie is highly adaptable and always ready for the next adventure. He leads with his head, as all sevens do. His intuition is a great example of the complicated way a seven relates to people. Sevens are feelings repressed, but extremely quick thinkers. They think and act quite efficiently when they aren’t getting distracted. Feelings get left out in the cold.

The enneagram type seven is known for entertaining. Jamie does this with his sense of humor (which is one of the things that Claire loves about him). His ease of character allows him to be who he needs to be in any given group or situation.

Jamie is a friend to all. “The more the merrier,” is his mentality. He is beloved by his comrades because he treats them with respect. Everyone is valuable.

However, the visionary force of a type seven is hard to stop. When they are determined, nothing can get in their way, and they can sometimes lack empathy. When limits are pressed upon them, they push back with great stubbornness, as we see frequently with Jamie’s character.

Type sevens also have a way of spinning things optimistically and anticipating the future. No matter what is going on, a seven can reframe it in a positive light in order to digest the situation better. This type doesn’t want to feel boxed in or controlled, and will do almost anything to avoid this. Instead of feeling great pain, sevens use their incredible headspace to either avoid or view it in a different light.

Captain Jack Sparrow (Pirates of the Caribbean)

Even though Jack Sparrow is a deceiving, thieving pirate, there is just something likable about him. His charisma, charm, and humor draw us in the way a type seven naturally does. He is nothing if not entertaining. Jack loves a well played trick, or joke especially when he’s the last one laughing.

Sevens also can’t get enough of life…

This can be interpreted in several ways. Living forever is the ultimate dream, as is part of the theme of the famous pirate. He also brings an intensity of spirit, wanting to enjoy all the things worth living for.

Furthermore, type sevens are known for their ability to think quickly, using wit whenever possible. Jack Sparrow uses this super power to get out of many sticky and dangerous situations. He would rather negotiate using his mind than risk physically fighting.

This brings us to another point. Sevens classically avoid pain. Usually physical pain is not the problem, it’s that twisted tormenting emotional pain they can’t stand. This is what makes sevens feel slippery. When there is pressure, attempted control, or force of any kind put on them emotionally, they find a way out.

Type sevens, like Jack, are constantly moving on to the next thing. They are both easily distracted and easily delighted. “Ooh… something fun and shiny is over there, let’s go that way!” Or “ahh, this is the most delicious drink I have ever tasted… life is bliss.” This focus on the future is also a way to avoid feeling the present.

What do sevens value most?

Freedom

“Wherever we want to go, we go. That’s what a ship is, you know. It’s not just a keel and a hull and a deck and sails. That’s what a ship needs. But what a ship is… what the Black Pearl really is… is freedom”

-Jack Sparrow

Enneagram type sevens love possibilities. They are grand visionaries, and adventurers. Jack Sparrow gives us a nice glimpse at what this type might look like as a character.

Thank you for reading! I hope you enjoyed these fictional enneagram type seven examples.

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Enneagram type 3 and fictional characters

Enneagram type 3 is fairly easy to spot in fictional characters because they are openly image conscious and extremely charming. They become whoever they need to be for the person, or people they are with. Threes love flattery, adoration, and attention. Their “crime of passion,” is deceit, lying to get what they want seems a small price to pay for threes: kings of rationalizing. Let’s talk about enneagram type 3 and fictional characters.

Scarlet O’hara

Our first example, Scarlet O’hara, is a perfect example of an enneagram type 3 fictional character. The belle of the south, she charms her way into the heart of many. She doesn’t mind that she also breaks hearts wherever she goes, as long as she gets what she wants in the end.

“Image conscious much, Miss Scarlet?” She takes the part of looking like the belle of the south seriously. Even when she has no money to dress herself properly, she enlists her servant to make her a gown out of the drapery so she won’t appear poor.

Her deceitfulness and charm do get Scarlet pretty far, but she is no match for Rhett Butler (who might also be considered a type 3). He sees right through her games, and falls in love with who she really is underneath.

It is hard for the type 3 to let go of the mask and stop performing. They believe to earn love, they must put on a show. They are only as good as their acheivements in their minds.

Scarlet does achieve! When she is left destitute on her plantation with no one, she makes sure there is food to eat, and begins to plan for the future, as threes can’t help but look forward. She has the, “failure is not an option” attitude of the type 3, and intends on winning in every aspect of her life.

Gilderoy Lockhart (from Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets)

The enneagram and fictional characters

Gilderoy Lockhart moves his career ahead through literally stealing the successful stories of brave wizards, performing a forgetting charm on them, and claiming their success as his own. Only a type three could smear the paths of right and wrong without a backward glance. Not only does he move ahead in life on this horrible deceit, but her wants to look good while doing it.

He is constantly concerned with his appearance and making sure he gets in front of the camera whenever one is nearby. He also has photos of himself up on the walls literally everywhere. This shows his type 3 image consciousness, and selfishness.

Type 3 loves admiration and flattery. We see Lockhart enjoying long lines of people waiting for his autograph in his latest book, and signing piles of fan mail with his portrait. He truly loves the attention and adoration drawn by his super fans.

Mr. Wickham

The enneagram type 3 and fictional characters

Another great example of a type 3 in literature (or film), is Mr. Wickham from Pride and Prejudice. He is the dashing soldier, charming and attractive who easily steals the hearts of many. With a simple look he can change the emotions in the room. He is social and popular, easy to like on the surface.

When we are first introduced to Mr. Wickham, we believe him to be noble and worthy of Elizabeth Bennet, our heroine. But we soon learn that his stories were full of falsehoods, in attempt to make himself look good.

When his lies fail to work on Elizabeth, he using his charm to attach himself to her younger sister, creating a new mess for everyone involved. He fears failure and not living up to the standards that society and birth have set for him.

The tragedy here is that he hasn’t learned his own value and insists on masquerading through life as who he thinks others wish him to be. He is self-promoting, and pretentious, letting his higher qualities go to waste.

Rachel Green

In exploring the enneagram type 3 and fictional characters we find another example in Rachel Green from “Friends.”

The enneagram type 3 and fictional characters

If you have seen the T.V. show friends, it is easy to see that Rachel’s character displays many of the type 3 behaviors, qualities and motivations. She is well-liked, has been popular in every phase of her life, and uses her good looks and charm to get what she wants.

The series begins with her making her first move of growth when she leaves her own wedding to a man she doesn’t want to marry. She is leaving behind a life of wealth and “easy living,” for a life of struggle, but one she will make her own. This is the beginning of her awareness and growth arch as a character.

Seeing success as living the life she wants instead of living a life full of money and things, is a big turning point for Rachel. The rest of the series follows her trying a failing, and trying again in relationships, careers, and other obstacles.

One of the great things about type 3: they don’t give up.

I hope you enjoyed this take on a few popular characters, helping us to understand the type 3 a little better.

Are you a type 3? Do you know a type 3? Maybe you thought of a different fictional character who is a type 3… feel free to comment about it!

Here is a type 3 pdf printable you can grab by using the button below.

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Enneagram Type One, and Fictional Characters

Recognizing enneagram types may be hard to do in our everyday lives, but in the exaggerated world of fiction, the types begin to stand out. Enneagram type one is usually easy to spot in fictional characters through their overly perfectionistic behaviors, desire to improve their surroundings, and pull towards justice and righteousness. Today, we are going to dive into the enneagram type one and fictional characters.

Can you think of a few type ones out in the fictional world?

Let’s start with a classic, and one of my personal favorite type ones:

Mary Poppins.

Come on… She is “Practically perfect in every way!”

Enneagram Type One, and fictional Characters

The whole point of Mary Poppins is improvement, a key element for type one. She changes the lives of the Banks family with her structure and way of being in the world.

She is always “put together,” proper, and orderly. Though she may allow some whimsy, and flourish imagination, she has a love of rules and what “should be done.”

Thinking more about enneagram type one and fictional characters, who else stands out?

Hermione Granger

Harry Potter’s, Hermione Granger in the first book is labeled a “know it all,” and “rule follower.” She always seems to know not just the right answer to every question, but the right and moral thing to do in every situation. She is very concerned with justice, and even finds herself breaking some of the precious rules for the sake of just cause. (Saving Buckbeak from an unjust and untimely death, helping a wrongly accused convict escape being captured, performing spells in order to serve the greater good).

Hermione also “mother’s” Harry and Ron, not in a gushy nurturing way, but in a ONE way. She reminds them of homework assignments, school rules, and comments endlessly on more things they could do correctly. She truly wants the best for them, and this is the type one way to show it, “I want to help you be the best you can be… by reminding you how you can improve yourself.”

Let’s consider one more type on our journey of enneagram type one and fictional characters.

Claire Fraser

Enneagram Type One and Fictional Characters

Claire Fraser is an English army nurse who finds herself 200 years back in time in the middle of hard times. When she is captured by a Scottish man who rescues her from assault, she is brought back to his clan. One of the men is suffering from a dislocated shoulder. She can’t stand to let the other men put the man’s shoulder back, the wrong way. She interferes even though she’s in danger, and has never met any of them before.

Because Claire is a type one, she fights for what is right, even if it is only fixing someone’s arm. We see this constantly, especially with the dynamic of her extensive medical knowledge from the future. She brings order to disorder, morals where there were none, and an overall improvement to every situation she encounters.

She is a present thinker (putting her in type one’s dependent stance). When she is caring for you, she is with you, compassionate and not distracted. Her black and white thinking and decision making allow her to have huge impact in her situation.

Seeing fictional characters through the eyes of the enneagram helps us understand the type a little better. Though real people may be more complex than characters we read about, or see on film, it helps us to identify and form language around what a certain type might look like.

And let’s face it, sometimes its just easier to talk about fictional characters than ourselves. Maybe you relate with Hermione, or Mary Poppins, and you can understand why they made the choices they made because you are a type one, motivated by justice, truth, and making a difference.

Can you think of an enneagram type one who is a fictional character? Let’s talk about it!

The Enneagram and Fictional Characters

Now available… A Packet Overview of all the types! This packet below, includes the format seen above, but for all 9 types!

Check out the enneagram for beginners video course! This is great to do with groups!

Enneagram for beginners video course